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Uganda clearly shows contraceptives not the answer to HIV/AIDS epidemic

By Brian Clowes, LifeSite News

The fatal danger of relentlessly pushing contraceptives on Uganda and other African countries was laid bare recently in an alarming new report showing that the most popular contraceptive in Eastern and Southern Africa may actually double the risk of contracting HIV. After experiencing success in combating HIV/AIDS in Uganda through an anti-contraception initiative, it’s not surprising to hear that contraceptives are part of, and not a solution to, the problem.

According to research published in The Lancet, women using the injectable birth control depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) became infected with HIV at a rate of 6.61 per 100 persons, compared with 3.78 for those not using that method. When used by HIV-positive women, transmission of HIV to men occurred at a rate of 2.61 per 100 persons compared with 1.51 when the women had used no contraception.
The study involved 3,800 couples in Botswana, Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia and Uganda.
 
Uganda made news in the fight against AIDS over the past decade because President Yoweri Museveni successfully attacked his country’s high HIV/AIDS rate through a program of systematic behavior modification. President Museveni said in 2004 that, “AIDS is mainly a moral, social and economic problem,” and that the best way to fight it is with, “relationships based on love and trust, instead of institutionalized mistrust, which is what the condom is all about.”
 
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