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Anglican Unscripted Episode 48

August 18th, 2012 Jill Posted in Anglican Communion, Anglican Mission in the Americas Comments Off

Not a week goes by (even in August) when the Unscripted team can't dig up some interesting news. Kevin and George discuss the "new thang" with AMiA and the turmoil at Pawley's Island. They also reveal some Crown Commission secrets, Anglican Job Postings and Affinity Dioceses. Peter Ould talks about an Englishman trying to sell more books and Allan gives some interesting history about leaving and staying in TEC at the same time.

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Moving Forward Together Statement

January 19th, 2012 Chris Sugden Posted in Anglican Mission in the Americas, News Comments Off

Raleigh, NC    January 18, 2012

On January 16-18, 2012, over 300 laity and clergy, representing 109 churches that have been a part of the Anglican Mission in the Americas, gathered at the Church of the Apostles, Raleigh, NC, for a sacred assembly. The assembly was hosted by Archbishop Onesphore Rwaje and the House of Bishops of the Anglican Province of Rwanda (PEAR), who sent three other bishops (Alexis Bilindabagabo, Laurent Mbanda, Louis Muvunyi) as delegates, and were joined by US bishops Thad Barnum and Terrell Glenn. Archbishop Robert Duncan and Bishop Julian Dobbs of the Anglican Church of North America (ACNA) joined the assembly as honored guests.
 
The assembly was a rich time of worship, prayer, and communion with God. In the traditions of classical Anglicanism and the East African revival, the assembly featured both form and flexibility, which fostered dialogue, reconciliation, healing, and—most importantly—listening to the Lord. A way forward was unclear at the outset of the assembly, but by its conclusion the next steps for moving forward together were evident.
 
Emphasizing collaborative leadership as an Anglican distinctive, Archbishop Rwaje and the House of Bishops asked Bishops Terrell Glenn and Thad Barnum to create a short-term team to give oversight and care for all clergy and churches that have been a part of the AMiA’s and desire to remain resident in Rwanda. This team is to be characterized by a spirit of openness, collaborating freely with clergy and laity throughout its constituent churches. Its structures are to be temporary and easily dismantled once its task is completed. It will be a team actively connected to the House of Bishops of Rwanda.

Read the rest of this entry »

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Communique from Archbishop Eliud Wabukala on the reconciliation meeting between the Anglican Church of Rwanda and AMIA

January 18th, 2012 Chris Sugden Posted in Anglican Mission in the Americas, News, Rwanda Comments Off

The Most Revd Dr Eliud WabukalaOn Wednesday January 4th, 2012 a reconciliation meeting was in Nairobi, Kenya, held between the leaders of the Anglican Mission in America (AMiA) and the Province of the Anglican Church of Rwanda (PEAR) at the invitation of the Most Rev'd Dr. Eliud Wabukala, Archbishop of the Anglican Church of Kenya (ACK) and Chairman of the Primates Council of the Global Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans (GAFCON/FCA)

Present were the Most Rev'd Dr. Eliud Wabukala (ACK), the Most Rev'd Onesphore Rwage (PEAR), the Rt. Rev'd Lauren Mbanda (PEAR), the Rt. Rev'd Chuck Murphy (AMiA) and the Rt. Rev'd John Miller (AMiA). Also present were the Most Rev'd Ikechi Nwosu (Church of Nigeria), the Rt. Rev'd Joseph Kanuku rACK), the Rt. Rev'd Timothy Ranji (ACK), the Rt. Rev'd Julius Kalu (ACK) and the Rt. Rev'd Dr. Gideon Githiga (ACK).

The Chairman made it clear that while there had been a painful and very public breakdown in the relationship between the leadership of the Anglican Mission in America and the Anglican Church of Rwanda he was confident that by God's grace reconciliation could be achieved and harmony restored. He invited both sides to present their concerns openly and urged all present to listen prayerfully.

Bishop Chuck Murphy began by expressing his profound regret for the broken relationship and stressed his commitment to lead AMiA as a single-minded mission agency. He was deeply distressed by the public accusations made against him but remains determined to fulfill the mandate that had been given to him and Bishop John Rodgers when they were consecrated in Singapore in January 2000, by Archbishops Kolini and Tay.
 
Archbishop Onesphore Rwage also acknowledged his deep distress at the broken relationships since he counted Bishop Murphy to be a friend of many years. He also expressed his appreciation for the amazing work that has been accomplished by the AMiA. His concerns were focused on the confusion brought about by the continuing role of the former Archbishop, the lack of financial transparency and the recently announced
plans to separate from the Church of Rwanda and function independently without adequate prayer or consultation.

After a lengthy discussion between all parties, including those present as observers, the following points were agreed to :
 
1. They were all resolved that forgiveness should come from both sides of the divide.

2. The founding Fathers (Archbishops Kolini, Young and Tay) should work together with the incumbent Archbishop of Rwanda with the former acknowledging the ecclesiastical authority of the latter.

3. The Church of Rwanda agreed to stop looking at AMiA's mistakes and look forward and walk together for the sake of the Gospel.

Read the rest of this entry »

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Anglican Mission Winter Conference Concludes

January 18th, 2012 Jill Posted in Anglican Mission in the Americas Comments Off

By Cheryl M Wetzel, Virtueonline

The Anglican Mission closed their winter conference Saturday, January 14 in Houston. Amid the context of morning worship, Bishops Phil Jones and TJ Johnson drew summaries for those in attendance from their own times of doubt and uncertainty. The conference theme was the Work of the Holy Spirit. The final encouragement was to embrace the Spirit and follow the work he has already begun.

Bishop TJ Johnson compared the current time of troubles in the Anglican Mission with the story of David and Goliath. "David picked up five stones from the river bed and ran across the valley to meet Goliath. We are all going home to meet our own Goliaths."

"I have picked up three stones here today, to take home with me:
1) The cause of Christ
2) The Kingdom of God in context of Anglican heritage
3) The Hope of glory

"Those are my stones. Rwanda took me in 3 months after leaving TEC. It was 2 years before we heard any official statements from Rwanda. We went from 1 church to 6 and it was a lonely, difficult time. I didn't see it as a garden. I felt it was a wilderness but the Holy Spirit began to prepare me, just as surely as he preparing you. He began to build into me those things that are unshakable truths. He was preparing me not for that day but this day. These last two months. This time of doubt and uncertainty.

"So I want to leave you with this: do not avoid the wilderness. If you are in a wilderness, the Word of God will come to you. He empowers, transforms and enables. That is where we are and I have great expectations."

The challenge of wrapping up the conference fell to Bishop Phil Jones. He concentrated on the Magi who traveled to an unknown destination, following the star of Bethlehem. In Jerusalem, they met with Herod and after that meeting, found the baby Jesus. They determined to go home a different way, not back to Herod as promised. "The Magi didn't understand everything, especially when they started the journey, but they wanted to be a part of what was happening. That's what the Anglican Mission is all about. We don't understand everything, but we want to be a part of whatever God is doing here in the US, right now," Jones declared.

Read here


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AMiA winter conference

January 15th, 2012 Jill Posted in Anglican Mission in the Americas Comments Off

by Cherie Wetzel, Anglicans United

Not the demise it was reported to be

I am at the Anglican Mission Winter Conference in Houston, TX. The conference started Wednesday night, and I arrived Thursday at noon. The first thing I noticed when I walked through the corridors was young people. Young men and women in their 20’s and 30’s. Gathered loosely in small groups, the animated discussions were refreshing to see and hear. This is not your average TEC conference with gray haired people dominating the landscape. This is the church we have heard about via the Wall Street Journal and USA Today. Young singles and married couples that supposedly only go to non-denominational churches – you know: no prayer books, no hymnals, no organ, no “dead white man” music. Everything is on the screen or the wall and the band is terrific. Authority? No thanks. What don’t you older folks understand about the word non-denominational?

When you speak with the young people here and ask them about their church history, you hear about their prior years in the non-denominational church – or no church at all – and their desire for something more. Something bigger. Something with history. Even something with authority figures. In their searching, they found Anglicanism. The ordered service, the concentration on the reading of and explanation of Scripture. Their commitment to mission, both foreign and local. The emphasis on Jesus: his life, and his ministry and by connection, your ministry. It isn’t naïve expectation, it’s a real desire to find something beyond a job; something that can impact your life and improve it.

Read here

Read also: Bishops discussion on Thursday’s group sessions


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Bishop Murphy Answers Questions about AMIA Split

January 14th, 2012 Jill Posted in Anglican Mission in the Americas, Rwanda Comments Off

Bishop Chuck MurphyBy David Virtue, VOL

Virtueonline interviewed AMIA Chairman and Bishop of the Anglican Mission in the Americas, the Rt. Rev. Charles "Chuck" Murphy III, about the split, how he is handling it, and what he thinks the outcome will be.

VOL:How much of the $46 million raised by the AMIA and spent over the last 11-12 years went to Rwanda?

Murphy:We sent them $5,078,000 not counting other pass through gifts totaling several million more.

VOL:To date how many parishes have left AMIA for the pull away group?

Murphy:To date, I only know of 4-5 congregations. I suspect by the end of the day, it could be 20-25 congregations, which include the Apostles Mission, networks and congregation in the Birmingham Alabama network. We will know more next week. For these to leave, they will need a process to disaffiliate.

VOL: You talked in your message about the pain and hurt you have felt, do you have a sense of betrayal by people who you thought were your friends?

Murphy:I am genuinely surprised, but I want them to do what the Lord is calling them to do.

Read here


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Archbishop of Kenya to host meeting in Nairobi January 4th between AMIA and Rwanda

January 4th, 2012 Chris Sugden Posted in Anglican Mission in the Americas, News, Rwanda Comments Off

Bishop Charles MurphyGeorge Conger reports that the chairman of the GAFCON Primates Council is to host a meeting on January 4th between the Province of Rwanda and AMIA bishops.

The leader of the Anglican Mission in America, Bishop Chuck Murphy, will meet with the Primate of Rwanda today to seek a resolution to the split that has seen nine AMiA bishops quit the province and the Anglican Communion.

The Archbishop of Kenya, Dr. Eliud Wabukhala will host the 4 Jan 2012 meeting between Bishop Murphy and Archbishop Onesphore Rwaje in Nairobi.  Other African and North American church leaders are expected to attend the meeting as well.

Last month Bishop Murphy stated he would travel to London to meet with retired Archbishops Emmanuel Kolini, Moses Tay and Yong Ping Chung to begin the work of finding a new provincial sponsor for the AMiA.

A statement released after the 12-14 December meeting omitted mention of a new home.  It did affirm, however, the retired archbishops’ continued support for the missionary society concept advocated by Bishop Murphy.

While attempts to find overseas backing were explored, the AMiA leadership also sent out feelers toward the ACNA, to see how the North American Anglican province-in-formation might view the split.  At the close of a 20 December meeting in Pittsburgh between ACNA leader Archbishop Robert Duncan and two of the nine resigned bishops, Archbishop Duncan issued a pastoral letter stating that reconciliation between the breakaway bishops and Rwanda was a condition for further talks that would allow the breakaway bishops to find a new provincial home.

Read more here

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Rwandan HOB Appoints Bishops Glenn and Barnum to Oversee AMIA Congregations in US

December 14th, 2011 Jill Posted in Anglican Mission in the Americas, Rwanda Comments Off

By David Virtue, VOL

The House of Bishops of the Anglican Province of Rwanda (PEAR) has appointed Bishop Terrell Glenn, Jr., of Charlotte, NC, and Bishop Thad Barnum of Fairfield, CT, to oversee the care and shepherding of all clergy who are canonically resident in PEAR and affiliated with the Anglican Mission in the Americas. Bishops Glenn and Barnum will work on behalf of PEAR and with the leadership of The Anglican Mission in the Americas in assisting clergy and congregations with their present and future canonical residencies.

"We are deeply saddened and dismayed by the recent turn of events that have brought pain and separation between the Province of Rwanda and the Anglican Mission in the Americas. We are also deeply grieved by the subsequent 'Internet' eruptions and email trails that have contributed to further damage in our witness before believers and non-believers alike," wrote The Rev. Alan Hawkins, Network Leader of the Apostles Mission Network in the AMIA. (NOTE: VOL was told that this statement did not include Virtueonline as one of the eruptors.)

Read here


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Press Release from AMiA Regarding Finances

December 10th, 2011 Jill Posted in Anglican Mission in the Americas Comments Off

From Anglican Ink

Addressing Finances with Rwanda
 
The Anglican Mission has freely and without compulsion given 10% of the revenue it receives from parish tithes to the support of the Province of Rwanda as part of its 10%-10%-10% principal of giving. In addition, other gifts have been given to the Province of Southeast Asia as well as other global Anglican movements like GAFCON, ACNA, CAPA and Global South Encounters. (see Tithe Gifts to Rwanda chart*)
 
The method of giving the tithe to Rwanda has always been done in consultation with the Archbishop of Rwanda. Gifts were directed in three ways: (see Anglican Mission Tithe Gifts 2004-2010 chart) 1) a portion of the moneys were sent directly to the Province of Rwanda, 2) Travel related expense for the Province and its leaders were paid directly by the Anglican Mission, as agreed to by the Archbishop, and therefore did not go to Provincial Accounts, 3) Designated support as part of the tithe was paid for or given by the Anglican Mission to assist in cases of special need. (see Designated Support as Part of the Rwandan Tithe chart)
 
Read here
 
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AMIA Bishop Murphy Resigns as Primatial Vicar in the Province of Rwanda

December 8th, 2011 Jill Posted in Anglican Mission in the Americas, Global South, TEC Comments Off

by David Virtue, VOL

Anglican Mission in the Americas will go it alone until new overseas oversight is formed
Three overseas archbishops stand with AMIA

 The Anglican Mission in the Americas (AMIA), the first group of Episcopalians to leave The Episcopal Church over a crisis of faith and leadership more than a decade ago, has withdrawn from the Anglican Province of Rwanda following a breakdown in talks between Rwanda and the Anglican Mission, which was exploring the possibility of reorganizing as a Missionary Society and no longer simply as a Personal Prelature.

The chairman of the Anglican Mission, the Rt. Rev. Charles H. Murphy, III announced yesterday that he and seven of his fellow Anglican Mission bishops, along with retired Bishop John Rodgers, have resigned from the Anglican Province of Rwanda due to a strong difference in opinion about the future structure and identity of the Anglican Mission. You can read the letter of resignation here.

Bishop Murphy had been seated as a Primatial vicar in the Rwandan House of Bishops on an equal footing with Rwanda's House of Bishops.

Read here


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A Statement from the Archbishop of Rwanda and the Primatial Vicar of the Anglican Mission in the Americas

November 15th, 2011 Jill Posted in Anglican Mission in the Americas Comments Off

From AMiA

We have recently been made aware that a number of unfounded rumors and false assertions regarding the relationship between the Anglican Mission and Rwanda have begun to swirl in various circles and on the Internet. We are releasing this statement together to urge you not to be misled or distracted by those who would sow destructive seeds of discord through innuendo and commentary, for we know that this is the work and design of the Enemy.

The work and the relationship between the AMiA and the Province of Rwanda remains solid and cherished, as we discuss and explore together the future shape of our life and our work in the mission from the Lord which we share on two continents. As always, we ask for your prayers and support as we continue to seek the best way forward together in growing the Lord’s Kingdom on both sides of the Atlantic.

The Most Rev. Onesphore Rwaje
Archbishop and Primate
Province of the Anglican Church of Rwanda

The Rt. Rev. Charles H. Murphy, III
Primatial Vicar and Chairman
The Anglican Mission in the Americas

Read also further clarification from Virtueonline

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A Statement from the Archbishop of Rwanda and the Primatial Vicar of the Anglican Mission in the Americas

November 5th, 2011 Jill Posted in Anglican Mission in the Americas, Global South Comments Off

We have recently been made aware that a number of unfounded rumors and false assertions regarding the relationship between the Anglican Mission and Rwanda have begun to swirl in various circles and on the Internet. We are releasing this statement together to urge you not to be misled or distracted by those who would sow destructive seeds of discord through innuendo and commentary, for we know that this is the work and design of the Enemy.

The work and the relationship between the AMiA and the Province of Rwanda remains solid and cherished, as we discuss and explore together the future shape of our life and our work in the mission from the Lord which we share on two continents. As always, we ask for your prayers and support as we continue to seek the best way forward together in growing the Lord’s Kingdom on both sides of the Atlantic.

The Most Rev. Onesphore Rwaje
Archbishop and Primate
Province of the Anglican Church of Rwanda

The Rt. Rev. Charles H. Murphy, III
Primatial Vicar and Chairman
The Anglican Mission in the Americas

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Anglican Mission, ACNA ‘Clarify’ Their Roles

May 21st, 2010 Jill Posted in Anglican Church in North America, Anglican Mission in the Americas Comments Off

From The Living Church

At the request of the Anglican Church of Rwanda, the Anglican Mission in the Americas is seeking a greater distance from the Anglican Church in North America, which it helped found.

The Anglican Mission will ask the ACNA’s provincial council, which meets June 8 and 9, to change its status from jurisdiction to ministry partner. Leaders of both the ACNA and the Anglican Mission said that there was widespread confusion about how the two ministries relate to each other. Both parties said the new arrangement clarifies their structural relationship.

Changing the affiliation “will allow the Anglican Mission to maintain a level of connection to the North American Province, even though the missionary movement will remain under the spiritual and canonical authority of Archbishop Emmanuel Kolini and the Province of the Anglican Church of Rwanda,” said a communiqué from the Anglican Mission. “It also allows for the Anglican Mission to continue to function as a missionary movement committed to church planting as we have for the last decade.”

A communiqué from the Most Rev. Robert M. Duncan, Archbishop of ACNA, said the Anglican Mission’s request for a different affiliation “came as a result of a January resolution by the Rwandan House of Bishops objecting to the dual membership of Rwanda’s missionary bishops in the North American College of Bishops.”  Read here

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Special Report: Anglican Mission’s Structural Relationship within the ACNA

May 19th, 2010 Jill Posted in Anglican Church in North America, Anglican Mission in the Americas Comments Off

From AMiA

A special communique from the Anglican Mission in the Americas: The Anglican Mission’s Relationship with the Anglican Church in North America

For the past year Bishop Chuck Murphy and Archbishop Bob Duncan have been seeking to clarify the Anglican Mission’s structural relationship within the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA). This clarification, as required by our original protocol, is necessary as we approach the ACNA Provincial Council to be held June 8 – 9.

 By way of background, the Constitution and Canons of the Anglican Church in North America were drafted such that various groups might be integrated into the provincial structure of the ACNA as jurisdictions. In addition, the Canons made provision for another level of association designated as “Ministry Partners”. The Ministry Partner membership status as defined in the Constitution and Canons of the ACNA actually outlines very succinctly the appropriate relationship between the Anglican Mission and the ACNA as they seek to work together in church planting across North America. This status allows for entities such as ministry organizations, dioceses, seminaries and even monastic orders “to support each other in ministry to extend the Kingdom of God”, and the Anglican Mission is happy to join with other groups who have or seek this Ministry Partner status. Read the rest of this entry »
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Lessons from Little Rock

March 12th, 2009 Jill Posted in Anglican Communion, Anglican Mission in the Americas, Church of England, TEC Comments Off

By Charles Raven, SPREAD

On the 6th April 1998 TJ Johnston, an Episcopal priest and senior pastor of an unofficial church plant in Little Rock, Arkansas, became a missionary priest of the Province of Rwanda under the oversight of John K. Rucyahana, Bishop of Shyira. St Andrew’s Little Rock had been formed only some two years previously out of a sense of calling to start a faithful missionary congregation in a revisionist diocese and now Johnston was within days of being deposed by Larry Maze, the Bishop of Arkansas.

Though growing, the church was small and did not have much in the way of financial or social muscle, but this courageous stand set off a chain of events which was to lead to the formation of the Anglican Mission in America and create the precedent for other African jurisdictions which are now coming together in the emergent Province of the Anglican Church in North America with over 100,000 regular Sunday worshippers. At an early stage, Chuck Murphy, later to become the lead bishop of the Anglican Mission in America, saw clearly what was unfolding, saying “David took on Goliath with – a little rock! In God’s hand, that little rock was all he needed.” (1)

It is now increasingly clear that the same struggle for the gospel is being played out on the other side of the Atlantic, in England itself. In a recent post ‘Suddenly it’s all over for the Anglican Communion’ John Richardson has persuasively argued that the old Lambeth based Communion is essentially finished and the main question still to be resolved is which way the Church of England will go. Will it, like Wales and Scotland, move towards TEC and the Anglican Church of Canada, or does it have an orthodox future?

Unlike John Richardson, I think the answer to that question is important for more than just England itself. The fact that the old Anglican Lambeth based Communion is clearly dying on its feet could more optimistically be seen as a necessary stage in the transition to a confessionally based Communion and the moral momentum of history means that what happens here in England can very significantly help or hinder that transformation.

It is highly unlikely that an orthodox future for Anglicans in England will be achieved without some boundary crossing by overseas Primates, at least as a short term measure. The need for alternative oversight is becoming more pressing as missionary congregations outside official structures continue to grow yet not infrequently find themselves aggressively opposed at parish and diocesan level, often by clergy and bishops who have succumbed to the prevailing cultural drift from orthodox Christian doctrine and morality.

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How many Anglicans are there within ACNA? More than in 12 other Provinces of the Communion!

February 16th, 2009 Jill Posted in Anglican Church in North America, Anglican Mission in the Americas, Anglican Network in Canada, Convocation of Anglicans in North America Comments Off

By TexAnglican

The following statistics have been put together by the Common Cause Partnership and are posted on the diocese of Fort Worth’s web site:

[Image: P Hughes, here

On every Sunday morning, some 81,311 people worship at the 693 congregations of the Anglican Church in North America. These people and parishes are already outside of The Episcopal Church and The Anglican Church in Canada. The large majority are temporarily under the oversight of six separate Anglican provinces.

The Anglican Church in North America will unify the parishes and membership of a number of jurisdictions:

• The Anglican Mission in the Americas (Rwanda) reports an average Sunday attendance of 21,600 in 180 congregations (40 of which are churches in formation called “networks”).

• The Convocation of Anglicans in North America (Nigeria) has 69 congregations with an average Sunday attendance of 9,828.

• The Reformed Episcopal Church has 150 parishes and an average Sunday attendance of 13,000.

• There are 51 parishes under the temporary oversight of Uganda with an average Sunday attendance of 7,000.

• There are 55 parishes in The United States under the temporary oversight of the provinces of Kenya and the Southern Cone with an average Sunday attendance of 10,000.

• Four entire dioceses separating from The Episcopal Church, with a combined 163 parishes and an average Sunday attendance of 16,483 (The Episcopal Church congregations and members having been excluded from this count) are temporarily dioceses of the province of the Southern Cone.

• The Anglican Network in Canada (Southern Cone) is composed of 24 congregations with an average Sunday attendance of 3,400.

• One congregation is under the temporary oversight of West Africa.

Based on a firm Sunday attendance average of 81,311 people, it is reasonable to very conservatively project that more than 100,000 Anglicans in North America are active members of a congregation of the proposed province (In many cases, total membership often runs at two to three times average Sunday attendance. For instance, The Episcopal Church reports an average Sunday attendance of 768,476 in 2007 and an active baptized membership of 2,116,749.)

While each individual group is small, as a united body, the Anglican Church in North America stretches from one end of North America to the other and has as many or more (in some cases, significantly more) members than 12 of the Anglican Communion’s 38 provinces (Bangladesh, Brazil, Hong Kong Sheng Kung Hui, Indian Ocean, Japan, Jerusalem & Middle East, Korea, Mexico, Myanmar, Scotland, Southern Cone, Wales)

 

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The Future of Anglicanism in North America: Liveblogging from AMiA Winter Conference

February 1st, 2009 Jill Posted in Anglican Mission in the Americas Comments Off

By James  Gibson, Sanctus

Bishop Terrell Glenn opened the forum with prayer. Right now, he is making a few announcements about some of the books available for purchase at the conference. A quick survey of the conference attendees indicates that well over half have purchased and/or read Bishop Thad Barnum’s book, Never Silent.

Participants in the forum: Rev. Charles Hayes, Bishop David Anderson (AAC and CANA), Bishop Don Harvey (Anglican Network in Canada), Bishop Chuck Murphy (AMiA), Bishop Robert Duncan, "twice elected Bishop of Pittsburgh," (Common Cause Partnership/ACNA), Bishop Bill Atwood (Anglican Church of Kenya), Bishop Martyn Minns (CANA), Bishop Glenn (AMiA).

Future of Anglicanism: Q & A Part I

Future of Anglicanism: Q & A Part II

 

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AMiA Leader Urges Go Slow Policy in Move Towards New Anglican Church

February 1st, 2009 Jill Posted in Anglican Mission in the Americas Comments Off

David VirtueBy David Virtue, VOL in Greensboro at the AMiA Conference

The leader of the Anglican Mission in the Americas (AMiA), The Rt. Rev. Chuck Murphy is urging caution in the development of a new North American Anglican Province.

"In my judgment there is a process we have to go through and we must not fast forward the process in a way that might be short sighted," he told VOL in an interview at the 9th Annual Winter Conference here in the Sheraton Hotel.

"All of the CAPA Global South Bishops have an opinion and a role to play and a direction to offer. We have yet to hear from them. To make this happen, we must pull together. They haven’t responded. We (the AMiA) are part of the Province of Rwanda and their House of Bishops and Synod has yet to discuss it."

Bishop Murphy, 61, said he felt that June was too soon to announce a fully developed orthodox Anglican body as an alternative to The Episcopal Church, but he gave no indication that AMiA would not be a part of it.

"I came out of GAFCON looking for a new province. It will happen, but the process has to be approved by all the GAFCON primates."

"I am fully committed to a new province. It is inevitable, but the issue is timing. God is bringing about a Second Reformation, a revival of His Word and Spirit and there is no stopping it. The Episcopal Church is slowly dying on the vine, both spiritually and financially. Homosexuality is making a mockery of marriage. Most Christian families will never buy into it. Homosexuals are not flocking into TEC as they predicted. Gene Robinson is an aberration."

Women’s Ordination

"The AMiA has made up its mind that women can be ordained to the diaconate, but we acknowledge that the Province of Rwanda takes a different view. The process of reception will continue.

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GREENSBORO, NC: 1700 Jubilant Anglicans Pack Ballroom to Kick off AMIA Conference

January 30th, 2009 Jill Posted in Anglican Mission in the Americas Comments Off

By David Virtue, Virtueonline

the exuberant sounds of a praise band, 12 bishops, three archbishops and nearly 140 clergy processed through a packed hotel ballroom of 1700 jubilant Anglicans to kick off the 9th Annual Winter Conference of the Anglican Mission in the Americas (AMiA).

Two orthodox and controversial bishops, The Rt. Rev. Robert Duncan, Bishop of Pittsburgh and Moderator of the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) and The Rt. Rev. Donald Harvey, Bishop of the Anglican Network in Canada (ANiC) are also present here.

Duncan is a former bishop of The Episcopal Church and Harvey is a former bishop of the Diocese of Eastern Newfoundland and Labrador in the Anglican Church in Canada. He now leads a growing number of orthodox parishes across Canada and has been received into the Province of the Southern Cone under Archbishop Gregory Venables. Both bishops are committed to the emergence of a new orthodox Anglican province in North America having left their respective denominations believing they have adopted positions on faith and morals at variance to Holy Scripture.

Both men received a standing ovation from conference participants. Duncan praised AMiA leaders and participants saying they are a vital part of the new emerging church. "You are such a vital part of what is happening. Courage breeds courage and AMIA has its great share of courage. I declare you are in full communion status. We need your prayers, your witness with so many who join us from around the world. Please keep praying, partnering and also keep evangelizing…and for God’s sake please keep planting (churches). We love you."

In his opening comments, The Rt. Rev Charles (Chuck) Murphy III, a Missionary Bishop of the Province of the Episcopal Church of Rwanda and a Bishop and Chairman of the Anglican Mission of the Americas, said AMiA has entered a new phase with its Global South partners. "It is time to send a message that we are now brothers in mission and no longer children. We are brothers who stand together." Murphy noted that this day, January 28, marks the anniversary of the death of Henry VIII, 462 years ago, a man who birthed the Church of England and not the Church in England. "We live in challenging, serious and changing times. The focus will be on Jesus, the One who called us and blessed us and empowers us to be a mission throughout North America. This the message the world needs. It is THE message. It is THE Good News. HE is the message." Murphy said the world is awash in the supermarket of ideas. "There is a need for a stronger mission, now more than ever. He said Muslims, Hindus, Buddhists forget the Trinity, the Atonement, the Cross and Amazing Grace. "We have this message to tell the world."

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