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Diocese of South Carolina Formalizes Wordwide Anglican Ties

March 16th, 2014 Jill Posted in South Carolina, TEC Comments Off

The Diocese of South Carolina has been formally recognized as a member in good standing of the Global Anglican Communion.

On Saturday, March 15, the Diocese’s 223rd Annual Convention unanimously accepted an invitation to join the Global Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans (GFCA) and temporarily enter into a formal ecclesiastical relationship known as provisional primatial oversight from bishops in the Global South.

The convention’s nearly 400 delegates also voted to create a task force to explore more permanent affiliation options for the diocese. The task force will offer recommendations at the next Convention, which will be held next March.

Local critics of the Diocese’s 2012 separation from The Episcopal Church had said the disassociation would isolate the Diocese from the Global Anglican Communion. While the Diocese has maintained many informal relationships with organizations that are part of the communion, this formal primatial oversight arrangement makes clear that the Diocese is officially part of the greater Anglican Church.

“There’s an African proverb that wisely states ‘If you want to go fast go alone, if you want to go far go together,’ said the Rt. Rev. Mark J. Lawrence, 14th Bishop of the Diocese, in his address to the Convention. “This will give us gracious oversight from one of the largest Ecclesial entities within in the Communion; one which includes Anglicans from a diverse body of believers from Southeast Asia, the Middle East, Africa, South America, the Indian Ocean and many, many others.”

Read here


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Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina Seeks Provisional Primatial Oversight

March 10th, 2014 Jill Posted in South Carolina, TEC Comments Off

Bishop Mark LawrenceBy David W Virtue, VOL

The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina is looking for an ecclesiastical home.

Since leaving the Episcopal Church it has not come under any Episcopal or Anglican authority and has resisted coming under the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA).

An upcoming resolution to be presented at their Annual Diocesan Convention March 14-15 could change all that. In response to an offer by the newly created Global South Primatial Oversight Council for pastoral oversight, the diocese seeks to have a formal ecclesiastical connection to the larger Communion and a consequent pastoral relationship.

This new entity was created in Cairo, Egypt, by the Global South Primates Steering Committee on February 14-15, 2014.

Most importantly, however, this resolution is the response to something others in the communion have created. It provides a means for us to better make biblical Anglicans for a global age in this in between-time. We choose to see it as a providential provision which gives us further sacramental closeness with the global Anglican family which we so richly treasure.

The Diocese of South Carolina recognizes this as a "period of fluidity in the Anglican Communion" and reserves the right to revisit this decision, as a convention, should it be necessary during this temporary discernment period, however long it may last.

Several aspects of this resolution need to be made clear. First, this resolution in no way takes away from the need for, and the careful discernment of, an ultimate diocesan affiliation for the diocese. Therefore it is to be seen as a matter of both/and rather than either/or.

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Federal Judge Dismisses Case Against Bishop Mark Lawrence

August 25th, 2013 Jill Posted in News, South Carolina, TEC Comments Off

From the Diocese of South Carolina

U.S. District Court Judge Weston C. Houck today dismissed a federal trademark lawsuit filed by Episcopal Church Bishop Charles vonRosenberg against Bishop of the Diocese of South Carolina Mark Lawrence.

The decision acknowledges the authority of the Circuit Court of South Carolina to decide the rightful owner of the names, symbols and property of the Diocese of South Carolina.

“The sum of all disputes and conflicts arising in the wake of the Diocese’s estrangement from [the Episcopal Church] are more appropriately before, and will more comprehensively be resolved, in South Carolina state court,” stated Judge Houck in the order dismissing Bishop vonRosenberg’s lawsuit and denying his motion for an injunction to prohibit Bishop Lawrence from acting as bishop of the Diocese of South Carolina.

In January, the Diocese and several of its parishes filed a lawsuit asking the state court to issue a declaratory judgment against The Episcopal Church (TEC) to protect the Diocese’s real, personal and intellectual property and that of its parishes.

The Diocese filed the lawsuit after it dissociated from the Episcopal Church when the denomination attempted to remove Bishop Mark Lawrence. Following the Diocese’s decision, 49 churches representing 80 percent of the Diocese’s 30,000 members confirmed their desire to remain with the Diocese of South Carolina, disassociating from the Episcopal Church.

Read here

Canon Lawyer Allan S Haley analyses the decision here

 

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Truth & Consequences in the Diocese of Upper South Carolina

June 9th, 2013 Jill Posted in Same-sex blessings, South Carolina Comments Off

Bishop WaldoBy Sarah Hey, Stand Firm

By now, many informed Episcopalians in my diocese of Upper South Carolina have read the post over at Kendall Harmon’s blog, T19, of the letter from my rector to my parish, Christ Church, Greenville. In it, he states that 1) Bishop Waldo will approve same sex blessings in the diocese, and that 2) he [my rector] “will not authorize these rites for use here at Christ Church.” My parish is, in vast majority, quite pleased with Harrison’s decision and I am personally very thankful for the clarity and directness of his statement, and in writing as well, so that there can be no mistake or miscommunication. The conservatives whom I know in the diocese are, obviously, very displeased with Bishop Waldo’s decision.
 
This article will address three aspects about Bishop Waldo’s decision for conservatives in my diocese: the realities we face, the consequences that will occur, and the possible actions that we might take. As usual, I am also writing for the thousands who have found or will find themselves in similar situations all around the country within The Episcopal Church.
 
The Realities We Face
 
1) Bishop Waldo is a “known entity.” Informed Episcopalians in this diocese who regularly research people and positions and review blogs were very aware of his particular beliefs prior to his election. All of the clergy were aware, though many laity were not. But anyone who sought out information about Andrew Waldo, could easily find it.
 
To recap the things we knew before he was elected: he counted Bishop Robinson as his “mentor,” was clear that he sought to institute same sex blessings after General Convention approved a rite, counts Jesus as “my way” and “my truth,” and practiced Communion of the Unbaptized, in violation of the national church canons, at his old parish.
 
 
 
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An Overview of the Complex Situation in South Carolina

April 19th, 2013 Jill Posted in South Carolina, TEC Comments Off

Bishop Mark LawrenceBy A S Haley, Stand Firm

Lawsuits in San Joaquin and Quincy have prevented me from doing an update on the situation in South Carolina, and one is sorely needed. The litigation there has greatly intensified since I last wrote. Let’s recap, with links for those who want to view some of the actual pleadings, which are (sometimes sizable) .pdf downloads.
 
1. Bishop Lawrence’s Diocese and its Trustees, if you recall, brought the initial complaint in the Circuit Court for Dorchester County in Prince George on January 4, joined as plaintiffs by the sixteen individual parishes. The only defendant named was the Episcopal Church (USA), and the lawsuit sought a declaratory judgment against it that the plaintiff Diocese and congregations were the sole owners of their respective names, registered marks (including the Diocese’s traditional seal) and real properties. Copies of the complaint were served upon the Presiding Bishop, the Church’s Treasurer, and its South Carolina counsel (Mr. Thomas Tisdale) within a few days of its filing.
 
2. A little over two weeks later, ECUSA’s representatives had not yet filed any appearance in the lawsuit, although they had known about it since January 7 (and Mr. Tisdale was served the same day the complaint was filed, on January 4). The Diocese filed an amended complaint which added another fifteen parishes as plaintiffs, and also filed an application for an emergency temporary restraining order against ECUSA. (The latter’s Presiding Bishop had noticed, for January 26, a special convention of the entity that was then calling itself by the same name as Bishop Lawrence’s Diocese, “the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina”, and was threatening to infringe upon the registered name and marks of Bishop Lawrence’s Diocese.)
 
Read here
 
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ECUSA’s Desperation in South Carolina Knows No Bounds

March 7th, 2013 Jill Posted in South Carolina, TEC Comments Off

By A S Haley, Stand Firm

One can but marvel at the madness that drives megalomania. First of all, it knows no boundaries: no matter what the odds or the ultimate cost, everything can be sacrificed so long as the sacrifice is seen as advancing the goal, which is to annihilate anything that appears to be threatening, or that is not already under complete subjugation. And individual megalomania is as nothing compared to the institutional variety, which signals all too often the last stage of an institution’s eclipse. For when the rank and file are too ensconced in their ways to see where their leaders’ follies and delusions are taking them, then the outrages of those leaders grow in proportion as the institution itself declines.
 
So it would appear to be in South Carolina. Having learned nothing from their experience with an identically framed federal lawsuit in Fort Worth, the Presiding Bishop and her Chancellor have now spotted Provisional Bishop Charles vonRosenberg to an ill-advised and futile gambit in the Charleston Division of the Federal District Court in South Carolina.
 
No less than three law firms were engaged (presumably at ECUSA’s sole expense) to bring a complaint in that court, based on the federal trademark law known as the Lanham Act (15 U.S.C. Sections 1051 et seq.), against Bishop Mark Lawrence of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina. The claim is that Bishop Lawrence—who just last month obtained a State court temporary injunction against ECUSA and its agents from using any of the marks or insignia of his Diocese—is actually infringing on his own trademarks!
 
Read here
 
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Three More Parishes Join in Suit to Prevent TEC from Seizing Property

March 1st, 2013 Jill Posted in South Carolina, TEC Comments Off

Amended complaint shows 34 congregations stand against TEC, adds Episcopal Church of South Carolina as defendant
 
St. George, SC, February 28, 2013 – Support increased again for the Diocese of South Carolina’s fight to prevent The Episcopal Church (TEC) from hijacking more than $500 million in local property as three new parishes joined the suit, bringing the total number of congregations supporting the litigation to 34.
 
The amended complaint also added as a defendant The Episcopal Church in South Carolina, the name adopted by parishes that remain aligned with TEC, which previously had been the only defendant in the suit.
 
The three parishes named in the amended complaint filed with the South Carolina Circuit Court are St. Jude's, Walterboro; Trinity, Pinopolis, and Church of the Holy Cross, Stateburg.
This is the second time the Diocese’s suit has been amended to increase the number of parishes involved.
 
The Episcopal Church, the original defendant in the Diocese’s complaint, consented to the filing of the amended complaint. It and the new co-defendant have until April 4 to respond.
 
The suit asks the court to prevent TEC from infringing on the protected marks of the Diocese, including its seal and its historical names, and to prevent the church from assuming the Diocese’s identity, which was established before TEC’s creation.
 
Read here
 
 
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The Overflow of the Heart: Anglican Perspective

February 1st, 2013 Jill Posted in South Carolina, TEC Comments Off

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Presiding Bishop Unwittingly Speaks the Truth

January 30th, 2013 Jill Posted in South Carolina, TEC Comments Off

by Fr David Faulkner (Hat Tip: Barbara Gauthier)

“Most of us don’t live in a world where one person is the ultimate decider – because, over and over again, we’ve discovered that better decisions are made when they’re made in communities with appropriate checks and balances. Power assumed by one authority figure alone is often a recipe for abuse, tyranny and corruption.
 
-Presiding Bishop Katherine Jefferts Schori, speaking to the continuing Episcopalians in the State of South Carolina, Jan 26th, 2013 (ENS Article , emphasis mine)
 
I find myself in unfamiliar territory today: I agree with the Presiding Bishop…at least on the above quote. While railing against Bishop Lawrence of the departed Diocese of South Carolina, she unwittingly criticized him for alleged behavior that is far more characteristic of her behavior as the Presiding Bishop. Does she really not see the irony dripping off the above quote!? Perhaps the plank in her eye is obscuring her vision.
 
To compare the mentality of a brother bishop to school shooters (see here), or to call him and presumably those close to him "petty deciders or wolves who masquerade as sheep" is incredibly inappropriate for any Christian, not to mention bizarre. I truly have never before heard or read such a spiteful and hate-fueled speech on either side of our present unpleasantness. This type of hateful and over the top language is even worse coming from a leader who claims to speak for the "national Church" and all Episcopalians. Let me be clear: I am an Episcopal priest and the Presiding Bishop does not speak for me. I have no delusion that I share in any ownership of anything outside of my parish and my diocese. The idea that one person, even if one agrees with the present incumbent, can speak for all Episcopalians is sheer lunacy.
 
Read here
 
Read also:  Presiding Bishop denounces schismatics as terrorists and murderers by George Conger, Anglican Ink
 
 
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SC Court Issues Temporary Restraining Order to Keep ECUSA from Stealing Diocese’s Identity

January 24th, 2013 Jill Posted in South Carolina Comments Off

South Carolina Bishop Mark LawrenceMore information from A S Haley, Stand Firm

Late this afternoon (5:11 p.m. EST), the Circuit Court of South Carolina in Dorchester County (the Hon. Diane S. Goodstein presiding) issued a Temporary Restraining Order (“TRO”) which declares:
No individual, organization, association or entity, whether incorporated or not, may use, assume, or adopt in any way, directly or indirectly, the registered names and the seal or mark of The Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of South Carolina as are set out below or any names or seal that may be perceived to be those names and seal or mark. The registered names and mark that are subject to this order are: the seal of the Diocese of South Carolina as described in its registration with the South Carolina Secretary of State; the name “The Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of South Carolina”, as registered with the South Carolina Secretary of State; the name “The Diocese of South Carolina”, as registered with the South Carolina Secretary of State; and the name “The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina”, as registered with the South Carolina Secretary of State. Again, this seal and these names are those registered by this Plaintiff corporation [Bishop Lawrence’s Diocese of South Carolina] with the South Carolina Secretary of State.
The order was issued following an ex parte hearing before Judge Goodstein yesterday, and after Bishop Lawrence’s Diocese posted a bond set by the court at $50,000. A hearing may be held “ex parte” in cases of urgency, in order to prevent immediate harm from occurring. The opposing side does not need to be present; indeed, the Episcopal Church (USA) has not yet entered an appearance in the case, and does not seem to have been represented at the hearing.
 
The purpose of the bond is to ensure that any damages that may be caused by the Court’s issuance of the TRO without first hearing from the opposite side will be covered; such bonds are required by law as a condition of the issuance of a TRO, and the amount is fixed by the Court in each instance based upon individual circumstances.
 
The immediate urgency requiring the ex parte hearing, from the point of view of Bishop Lawrence and his Diocese, was the scheduled meeting this Saturday of the Episcopal remnant in South Carolina which desires to organize a new diocese within the Episcopal Church (USA) to replace the one that has withdrawn. In issuing notices for the meeting, the national Church and those working in concert with it have claimed the right to use the names and seal described in the Court’s order, which belong (by South Carolina law) to Bishop Lawrence’s Diocese.
 
Read here
 
 
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Circuit Court Blocks the Use of Diocese of South Carolina Identity By Anyone Outside of the Diocese

January 24th, 2013 Jill Posted in South Carolina Comments Off

From Titusonenine

St. George, SC, January 23, 2013 – South Carolina Circuit Court Judge Diane S. Goodstein today issued a temporary restraining order that prevents The Episcopal Church (TEC) and parishes and individuals associated with it from assuming the identity of the Diocese of South Carolina.

The judge’s order states, in part: “No individual, organization, association or entity, whether incorporated or not, may use, assume, or adopt in any way, directly or indirectly, the registered names and the seal or mark of The Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of South Carolina.”

The order specifically prohibits all but a handful of Diocesan employees, directors and trustees who are specified by name from using the Diocese’s identity.

Read here

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15 more parishes join South Carolina lawsuit against the Episcopal Church

January 23rd, 2013 Jill Posted in South Carolina, TEC Comments Off

From Anglican Ink

The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina reports that 15 further congregations have joined it in their 4 Jan 2013 lawsuit against the national Episcopal Church.

The 22 Jan statement reported that of the dioceses congregations, 31 had joined the lawsuit against the national church, 13 congregations were supporting Bishop Mark Lawrence and the diocese against the national church but had not yet joined the litigation, nine missions and two parishes had not declared how they would act, while eight parishes and eight missions had indicated they would remain affiliated with the national Episcopal Church.

“We are saddened that legal action is necessary to protect our members from an organization that uses the threat of legal action as a cudgel to keep its parishes in line,” Bishop Lawrence said.

“The colonists came to this land seeking freedom to worship in the manner they believed faithful. We seek to be free from the national church’s unorthodox theology which separates it from centuries of Anglican teachings and the fundamental beliefs of the global Anglican Communion,” he said, adding that South Carolina Episcopalians “hold a different understanding of the Gospel, the trustworthiness of Scripture and the person and work of Jesus Christ,” than that propounded by the national church’s leaders. “We will not deviate” from the historic faith, the bishop said.

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Diocese Seeks Declaratory Judgment to Prevent Episcopal Church from Seizing Local Parishes and “Hijacking” their Identities

January 4th, 2013 Jill Posted in South Carolina Comments Off

Bishop Mark LawrenceLawsuit filed to defend more than $500 million in property from ‘blatant land grab’ as TEC seeks control of Diocesan holdings and parishes. 

"Like our colonial forefathers, we are pursuing the freedom to practice our faith as we see fit, not as it is dictated to us by a self-proclaimed religious authority who threatens to take our property unless we relinquish our beliefs,” Bishop Mark Lawrence.

 St. George, SC, January 4, 2013 –The Diocese of South Carolina, the Trustees of the Diocese and congregations representing the vast majority of its baptized members today filed suit in South Carolina Circuit Court against The Episcopal Church to protect the Diocese’s real and personal property and that of its parishes.

The suit also asks the court to prevent The Episcopal Church from infringing on the protected marks of the Diocese, including its seal and its historical names, and to prevent the church from assuming the Diocese’s identity, which was established long before The Episcopal Church’s creation.

“We seek to protect more than $500 million in real property, including churches, rectories and other buildings that South Carolinians built, paid for, maintained and expanded – and in some cases died to protect – without any support from The Episcopal Church,” said the Rev. Jim Lewis, Canon to the Ordinary. “Many of our parishes are among the oldest operating churches in the nation. They and this Diocese predate the establishment of The Episcopal Church. We want to protect these properties from a blatant land grab.”

The Diocese of South Carolina was established in 1785 as an independent, voluntary association that grew from the missionary work of the Church of England. It was one of nine dioceses that voluntarily joined together to form The Episcopal Church in October 1789, which eventually became an American province in the worldwide Anglican Communion, also a voluntary association.

Read here

Read also the explanatory Timeline of Events

 

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Anglican Communion ignores Mark Lawrence’s deposition

December 21st, 2012 Jill Posted in South Carolina Comments Off

Bishop Mark Lawrenceby George Conger, Anglican Ink

The leaders of the Global South coalition of Anglican provinces have written to Bishop Mark Lawrence of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina stating they do not recognize the validity of Presiding Bishop Katharine Jeffert Schori’s purported deposition of him from episcopal office and the ordained ministry.

In a letter dated 14 December 2012, Archbishop Ian Ernest of the Indian Ocean, Bishop Mouneer Anis of Jerusalem and the Middle East, Archbishop Nicholas Okoh of Nigeria, Archbishop Eliud Wabukala of Kenya, Presiding Bishop Tito Zavala of the Southern Cone, Archbishop Stephen Than Myint Oo of Burma, and Archbishop Bolly Lapok of Southeast Asia said:

“We want to assure you that we recognize your Episcopal orders and your legitimate Episcopal oversight of the Diocese of South Carolina within the Anglican Communion.”

The primates’ letter follows the presiding bishop’s 5 Dec 2012 announcement that she had accepted the voluntary renunciation of the ministerial orders of the Bishop of South Carolina.

Bishop Lawrence responded to the 5 Dec announcement stating: “Quite simply I have not renounced my orders as a deacon, priest or bishop any more than I have abandoned the Church of Jesus Christ—But as I am sure you are aware, the Diocese of South Carolina has canonically and legally disassociated from The Episcopal Church. We took this action long before today's attempt at renunciation of orders, therein making it superfluous.”

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South Carolina schism descending into farce

December 15th, 2012 Jill Posted in South Carolina Comments Off

By George Conger, CEN

Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori has defrocked the Bishop of South Carolina, writing on 5 Dec 2012 that she had accepted the “voluntary renunciation of ministry” of Bishop Mark J. Lawrence.

However, Bishop Lawrence has responded that he felt no “need to argue or rebut” the accusations and actions as they were ridiculous.

In her press release announcing the move, Bishop Jefferts Schori said that acting under the terms of Title III, Canon 12, Section 7 the Presiding Bishop “has accepted the renunciation of the ordained ministry in the Episcopal Church of Mark Lawrence as made in his public address on November 17 and she has released him from his orders in this Church.”

Bisho Lawrence responded: “Quite simply I have not renounced my orders as a deacon, priest or bishop any more than I have abandoned the Church of Jesus Christ—But as I am sure you are aware, the Diocese of South Carolina has canonically and legally disassociated from The Episcopal Church. We took this action long before today’s attempt at renunciation of orders, therein making it superfluous,” the bishop said.

The announcement released by the church’s press office, the Episcopal News Service, said “pastoral outreach to Lawrence had been ongoing for a period of several years, including up to the time he announced his intentions” to withdraw from the General Convention of the Episcopal Church.

Read here


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AnglicanTV Interviews Bishop Mark Lawrence

December 9th, 2012 Jill Posted in South Carolina, TEC Comments Off

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Message from Bishop David Anderson

December 8th, 2012 Jill Posted in American Anglican Council, Anglican Communion, South Carolina Comments Off

From AAC

The Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, Katharine Jefferts Schori, has once again publicly announced that a bishop has renounced his ordained ministry in the Episcopal Church (TEC). The problem is that Bishop Mark Lawrence of South Carolina didn't renounce his ordained orders in TEC – he was shoved out by Jefferts Schori and her gang. At the time charges were brought against him, he was still committed to meeting with her again in New York along with the bishop of Upper South Carolina, as part of a reconciliation effort. Without cancelling the New York City appointment or waiting for the meeting to take place, her office announced his suspension and the placing of charges against him. This triggered pre-existing legislation in the Diocese of South Carolina that took the Diocese and Bishop Lawrence out of TEC.

Jefferts Schori's announcement on December 5 occurred only a few days before Pearl Harbor Day, December 7, when we remember the sneak attack by the Imperial Navy of Japan on the United States' naval base in Honolulu, Hawaii. Jefferts Schori's claim to have accepted Bishop Lawrence's "renunciation" shows that, in an ecclesiastical way, even the church – or at least the Episcopal Church – is capable of sneak attacks designed to put someone underwater before they know the blow is coming. 

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Canons are Made to be Broken: Anglican Perspective

December 7th, 2012 Jill Posted in South Carolina, TEC Comments Off

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori doesn't play by the rules. Specifically, she and her Council of Advice decided that the Bishop of South Carolina had renounced his orders as a bishop without following the canons, or laws, of the church. For example, the church's canons state that in order to renounce your orders, one must do so "in writing." The Bishop of South Carolina never wrote the Presiding Bishop, or any one for that matter, claiming to renounce his orders. This is just one example of the current state of lawlessness in The Episcopal Church. Canon Phil Ashey reflects on these recent events in this week's Anglican Perspective.

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South Carolina’s sorrow and pity for Katharine Jefferts Schori

December 6th, 2012 Jill Posted in South Carolina, TEC Comments Off

by George Conger, Anglican Ink

Mark Lawrence rejects charges of renunciation of his ministry

The Bishop of South Carolina has received the news of his removal from the ordained ministry with sorrow, and a little pity. On 5 Dec 2012 the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church announced that she had accepted the voluntary renunciation of the ministerial orders of the Bishop of South Carolina. However, Bishop Mark J. Lawrence reports the presiding bishop’s actions have no canonical significance.
 
On the fourth anniversary of her deposing Bishop Jack Iker by the same canonical maneuver, Bishop Jefferts Schori announced she had deposed Bishop Lawrence. The Episcopal News Service reported that pursuant to Title III, Canon 12, Section 7 the Presiding Bishop “has accepted the renunciation of the ordained ministry in the Episcopal Church of Mark Lawrence as made in his public address on November 17 and she has released him from his orders in this Church.”
 
Read here
 
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Presiding Bishop taking charge in South Carolina

November 30th, 2012 Jill Posted in South Carolina, TEC Comments Off

By George Conger, Anglican Ink

A gathering of national church loyalists has learned that Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori is backing their move to claim the mantle of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina.

The presiding bishop's attorney told the 15 Nov 2012 meeting of TEC loyalists the national church had been preparing for the fight with Bishop Lawrence and the majority faction in the diocese for some time. However assertions made at the meeting that the former Bishop of East Tennessee will be intervening on behalf of the presiding bishop supplant Bishop Mark Lawrence were unfounded.

The Rt. Rev. Charles vonRosenberg told Anglican Inkhis officiating at public worship as a priest in the jurisdiction of the Diocese of South Carolina was permitted under a license he held by Bishop Mark Lawrence, while his actions as a bishop were of a pastoral nature. The retired bishop said the had been given “no special or particular authority” to exercise episcopal office in South Carolina.

Questions over the presiding bishop’s actions have arisen in light of statements made by Mr. Tom Tisdale, a lawyer Bishop Jefferts Schori given at a 15 Nov 2012 “clergy day” held at St Mark’s Episcopal Church in Charleston. An open letter to the bishops of the Episcopal Church detailing her alleged violations of the canons prepared by the Anglican Communion Institute has also prompted questions.

Read here


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